Detecting, reporting, and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia

Author: Joseph Asamoah Frimpong

Co-Authors:

Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Meeyoung Mattie Park, Maame Pokuah Amo-Addae, Peter Adebayo Adewuyi, Thomas Knue Nagbe

Journal details:

Pan African Medical Journal

Pan African Medical Journal. 2017;27(1):9. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.supp.2017.27.1.12570]

Publication Date: May 5, 2017

Abstract

An essential component of a public health surveillance system is its ability to detect priority diseases which fall within the mandate of public health officials at all levels. Early detection, reporting and response to public health events help to reduce the burden of mortality and morbidity on communities. Analysis of reliable surveillance data provides relevant information which can enable implementation of timely and appropriate public health interventions. To ensure that a resilient system is in place, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided guidelines for detection, reporting and response to public health events in the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy. This case study provides training on detection, reporting and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia and highlights potential errors and challenges which can hinder effective surveillance. Table-top exercises and group discussion lead participants through a simulated verification and analyses of summary case reports in the role of the District Surveillance Officer. This case study is intended for public health training in a classroom setting and can be accomplished within 2 hours 30 minutes. The target audience include residents in Frontline Epidemiology Training Programs (FETP-Frontline), Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), and others who are interested in this topic.